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Research & Reports

This publication brings together theoretical approaches and practical experiences from Save the Children’s extensive work to support children’s participation and promote greater accountability to children. Its broad aim is to facilitate learning...

In the aftermath of Cyclone Nargis that devastated Myanmar in May 2008, and as part of Save the Children's efforts to improve accountability to children and their communities within an emergency context, Save the Children Myanmar undertook an...

Cyclone Nargis hit Myanmar on May 3-4 2008. More than 85,000 people died and an estimated 2.4 million people were severely affected by the cyclone and the tidal wave that followed. Many more were left without homes, food and clean water. Save the...

The financial crisis of 2008 that rocked world markets also undermined the economic stability of millions of families who now struggle to care for their children. In this volatile economic climate, Save the Children continued to deliver...

In the wake of Cyclone Nargis which devastated the Myanmar delta in May 2008, and as part of Save the Children's efforts to improve accountability, an external evaluation of Save the Children in Myanmar’s (SCiM) emergency response to cyclone...

Over the last few years, many Save the Children country offices have begun adapting their Partnership Defined Quality methodology to improve the quality of RH services for young people. At the same time, there has been an increased interest...

Hundreds of thousands of children are migrating within the Greater Mekong Sub-region (GMS) and beyond in East and South-East Asia. Many are invisible to the public. Many have been exploited. Yet children’s migration has drawn little attention....

This report is an outcome of the regional workshop on Proceedings of Save the Children and partner organizations on violence against children held in March in Bangkok. The workshop aims to adopt specific directions to follow up on the study’s...

Research by Save the Children UK in Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Myanmar (Burma), Tanzania and the UK shows that poor families can't afford enough food for their children to grow up healthy. Imagine... You are poor. You live in Bangladesh. Providing...

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